Notes from the Waxhaws

Posts Tagged ‘William Butler Yeats


leave a comment »

The Song of Wandering Aengus

I went out to the hazel wood,

Because a fire was in my head,   

And cut and peeled a hazel wand, 

And hooked a berry to a thread; 

And when white moths were on the wing, 

And moth-like stars were flickering out,

I dropped the berry in a stream

And caught a little silver trout.


When I had laid it on the floor

I went to blow the fire aflame,

But something rustled on the floor,

And some one called me by my name:

It had become a glimmering girl

With apple blossom in her hair

Who called me by my name and ran

And faded through the brightening air.


Though I am old with wandering

Through hollow lands and hilly lands,

I will find out where she has gone,

And kiss her lips and take her hands;

And walk among long dappled grass,

And pluck till time and times are done

The silver apples of the moon,

The golden apples of the sun.

~ William Butler Yeats

Written by Jim

January 22, 2017 at 2:29 pm

Posted in Poetry

Tagged with

wee folk

leave a comment »

Faeries, come take me out of this dull world,
For I would ride with you upon the wind,
Run on the top of the dishevelled tide,
And dance upon the mountains like a flame.
~William Butler Yeats, The Land of Heart’s Desire

I thought I heard a bit of a commotion during the night. Some garden fairies seem to have taken up residence during the cover of darkness…


Hand in hand, with fairy grace,
Will we sing, and bless this place.
~William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream

I think that people who can’t believe in fairies aren’t worth knowing. ~Tori Amos

Written by Jim

July 12, 2015 at 7:33 am